20 forgotten songs (from the 90's)

Every now and then, a song comes on the radio that takes
you back to a different time and place. I got the idea to
compile a list of songs from the 90's that have kind of
been lost over the years. I hope some of these songs will
take you back down memory lane.

 

 

 Verve Pipe- Photograph
                

 

The Verve Pipe were formed in Lansing, Michigan in 1992 by Brian Vander Ark (vocals, guitar), Donny Brown (drums, backing vocals), Brad Vander Ark (bass, backing vocals), and Brian Stout (guitar, backing vocals). The Vander Arks had played previously in Johnny with an Eye, and Brown and Stout had played in Water 4 the Pool -- both bands had been local favorites throughout Michigan.
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 Porno For Pyros- Pets
                             

 
Perry Farrell
's post-Jane's Addiction band, Porno for Pyros, followed the same path as his previous band, combining art rock, punk, heavy metal, and funk into one shrieking whole. On their self-titled 1993 debut, Farrell's pretensions got out of hand at times, resulting in some ridiculously self-absorbed conceptual pieces sitting next to some straightforward rockers and pop songs; it sold well at first, but soon slipped down the charts. While he prepared new Porno material in 1994, Farrell returned to the organization of Lollapalooza -- the traveling rock festival he conceived -- for the first time since 1992. The band released Good Gods Urge in 1996.
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 Toad The Wet Sprocket- Walk On The Ocean

 

Named in honor of a sketch by the Monty Python comedy troupe, Toad the Wet Sprocket became one of the most successful alternative rock bands of the early '90s, boasting a contemporary folk-pop sound that wielded enough melody and R.E.M.-styled jangle to straddle both the modern rock and adult contemporary markets. Singer Glen Phillips, guitarist Todd Nichols, bassist Dean Dinning (the nephew of '50s hitmaker Mark "Teen Angel" Dinning), and drummer Randy Guss formed the group in 1986
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Sponge- Molly (Sixteen Candles)

Sponge was one of the more underrated groups in the post-grunge boom of the mid-'90s. When they were on top of their game -- as evidenced by the hits "Plowed" and "Molly (Sixteen Candles)" -- the band's songs had a knack for jangly riffs and catchy, anthemic hard rock hooks, despite being wrapped in the fuzzy guitars and brooding seriousness that typified grunge music. Sponge grew out of a Detroit-based hard rock act called Loudhouse, which released an album on the Virgin label in 1988 before losing its record contract and disbanding shortly thereafter.
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 Local H- Bound For The Floor

 

Born David Scott Lucas, Scott is the nucleus of Local H. Not only is he the vocalist, but he is also the guitarist and bassist for the band. Raised in Zion, Illinois, Scott started Local H in 1987 with high-school friends Joe Daniels on drums and Matt Garcia on bass. When Matt left the band in the early 1990s, it was Scott who developed a unique way to play bass and electric guitar at the same time through a special guitar pick-up, eliminating a need for a bassist. After Joe left the band in 1999, Scott remained on as the sole original member of Local H.
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  Gandharvas- Downtime

 

In the early 1990s, five youths from London, Ontario decided to form a rock band named after a Hindu term meaning "celestial musicians to the gods." Paul Jago, guitarists Jud Ruhl and Brian Ward, bassist/keyboardist Beau Cook, and drummer Tim McDonald became the Gandharvas. After playing various live shows around the London area, Watch Music took an interest in the band; the Gandharvas then signed with the label in 1994. That same year saw the release of their debut album, A Soap Bubble and Inertia.
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 Hum- Stars

 

Endless feedback, a heavenly drone, and an obsession with science and outer space: these three elements perhaps most define the beautiful style that has become the trademark of the unmatchable Hum. Despite a career marked with slight commercial successes, most obviously their 1996 radio hit "Stars," Hum has never quite been given the full attention and emphasis that they deserve.
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